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The Blue Room

Posted on by sarah

The blue room is a large, luxurious en-suite double with a large spa bath and views overlooking the paddock where horses graze. Situated in the heart of the main house, ideal for single women and just a stroll downstrairs will lead you to the breakfast room.

The Barn

Posted on by sarah
Barn exterior

Our converted Barn unit is ideal for family escapes, a get away for couples or just a luxury stop over, whether you want to self cater or just come for bed and breakfast. With high quality finishes throughout and state of the art under floor heating this is country living in style. Its fully functioning kitchen, with oven, microwave, fridge/freezer and washing machine means your stay can be as flexible as you want it to be. It also has a wet room with a shower and disabled facilities in both the kitchen and bathroom.

Free wifi is available and there is a TV with all digital channels in the bedroom. The sofa bed in the living space can be easily converted into a bed to transform  this double en-suite into a family room- further mattresses can be added to accommodate more guests.

We also have a rain water harvesting system for our toilets that means we save water- an important feature in the south east-  one of the driest places in the united kingdom.

This light and spacious barn is perfect for families and couples and is dog friendly which is great if you dont want your furry friend to miss out on the holiday!


Why Wye!

Posted on by sarah

 Only 15mins from Iffin Farmhouse, by car, through the village of Petham (famous for its beautiful surrounding landscapes and “chocolate box” style cottages), past the poor house in Waltham and on along narrow country lanes to the top of the North Downs.

Absolutely stunning views stretching for miles to the most western edge of the county and on into East Sussex and to the South spectacular views of Romney Marsh.

In days long ago dense forest covered the low ground in Kent so travellers to France made their way along the North Downs. They dropped down to Wye to the ford on the River Stour. And so a hamlet grew up first near the river providing rest and comfort for travellers.

The more agile of walkers today can follow the same paths, also stopping off for some liquid refreshments at a variety of establishments before ascending a steep climb back up to the top of the Downs passing by The Crown before continuing eastwards to take in, again, the spectacular views.

The Crown was cut into the chalk hillside to commemorate the coronation of Edward VII by college students, on the Wye college estate on 12th June 1902. Restored between 1991 and 1995, recently re-whitened (April 1997) for Wye College’s 550th Anniversary The Crown can be seen from miles around

Turner Contemprary

Posted on by sarah
Turner Contemporary

On a cloudless day in March we finally made it to Margate! Meandering along the back roads from Iffin Lane past Howletts Wild Animal Park (http://www NULL.aspinallfoundation NULL.org/howletts), Wingham Wildlife Park (http://www NULL.winghamwildlifepark NULL.co NULL.uk/) and nostaligiacally the site of the Richborough Cooling Towers, which had been demolished in 21 seconds a few days previous (see demolition (http://www NULL.dailymail NULL.co NULL.uk/news/article-2113812/Demolition-Richborough-Power-Station-cooling-towers-YouTube-video NULL.html)) we arrived at the Turner Contemporary (http://www NULL.turnercontemporary NULL.org/whats-on) and the exhibition Turner and the Elements. Without any doubt the architectural style of the building is very contemporary and evokes a mixture of emotions against the backdrop of victorian Margate and its harbour and Turner’s sea scape.

On entering the spacious foyer was Rodin’s sculpture The Kiss, on loan from the Tate, which apparently has only been out of London on 3 ocassions.

On the first floor was the main, and first major exhibition devoted to the art of JMW Turner , exploring the role that the four Classical elements of air, earth, fire and water played in his art as well as his fasciation for depicting the elemnts in fusion. The exhibition also inclues several pianting s of the Margate coastline, offering a unique opportunity to experience the stunning works in the very lcoation that origianlly inspired Turner to create them.

Well worth 40 minute trip from Canterbury. Great Cafe and very wheelchair friendly.

Purple Flag Award

Posted on by sarah

Canterbury receives Purple Flag (http://www NULL.purpleflag NULL.org NULL.uk/uploads/DOCS/20-Canterbury_Case_Study_V2 NULL.pdf) accreditation!

The Purple Flag scheme recognises excellence in the management of town and city centres at night and aims to raise standards and improve the quality of our towns and cities at night.

As an accredited city centre, we can take pride in the fact the place in which we live, work and play is a safe and welcoming environment. Canterbury is one of only 25 town and city centres to have achieved this accreditation creating a real point of difference between our city and other destinations.

Great Expectations

Posted on by sarah

2012 is the bicentinary of the birth of Charles Dickens. He was  an English Novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian period. His own story is one of rags to riches which provided the vivid characters and exhaustive depiction of contemporary life so evident in his books. Watch the animated story of his life here (http://www NULL.bbc NULL.co NULL.uk/drama/bleakhouse/animation NULL.shtml)

Charles Dickens had many associations with Kent, as did his characters, including his death on 7 June 1870 at Gad’s Hill Place, Higham, Kent.  (http://www NULL.bbc NULL.co NULL.uk/drama/bleakhouse/animation NULL.shtml)

The photograph to the left is of St Thomas a Beckett Fairfield Church on the Romney Marsh in Kent which was used in the recent BBC televised adaptation of Great Expectations. Reputedly, as the film crew were setting up machines to reproduce the infamous marsh fog nature had the last laugh and rolled in on cue!

The Blean

Posted on by sarah

Kent Wildlife Trust was founded in 1958 and is the leading conservation organisation charity covering the whole of Kent and is dedicated to protecting wildlife and their habitats. One of the local areas being The Blean.

Lying between the cathedral city of Canterbury and the towns of Faversham, Whitstable and Herne Bay, The Blean is one of the largest areas of ancient woodland in England – over 11 square miles.

The woods have been shaped by local people for over a thousand years. Today, our woodsmen and conservation teams continue to manage this unique landscape, rich in wildlife, that we enjoy today.

Why not take a visit to the New Wildart Trail in Thornden Woods?

The first pieces of artwork have been installed on the Wildart Trail, an art and sensory all-access trail in Thornden Wood, between Canterbury and Herne Bay. Two wooden posts carved with images of wildlife found in the woods, drawn by children from Herne Junior School, can now be found on the trail, scul and more images have been routed onto coppiced tree stumps.

The trail will use natural, local materials to create sustainable, non-invasive artwork which will blend into the surroundings. The use of sustainable materials is essential on a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) and means that the artwork can evolve and change through the years; as pieces begin to decay, new artwork can be created and installed.

There is parking available on Thornden Wood Road, with space for blue badge holders and people with young children to park on the same side of the road as the all-access path.

For more information, please contact Kent Wildlife Trust’s Blean Project Office on 01227 719506. (Photo by Kathryn Barton)

London 2012 Olympics

Posted on by sarah

Canterbury is to play an exciting role in the build up to the London 2012 Olympics (http://www NULL.london2012 NULL.com/). It was announced last month that the city has been included on the route that the Olympic Flame will take on its 70-day journey around the UK.

The Flame will be in the district on the afternoon of Thursday 19 July 2012, just eight days before the opening ceremony of the London Olympics.

Torchbearers will carry it through local communities including where Iffin Lane/Hollow Lane (the Roman road Stone Street) joins Wincheap prior to a photo shoot in the Cathedral Precincts.

Seven local sports stars are hopeful of success including our window cleaner’s daughter, in the rhythmic gymnastics – Go for it Keziah (http://www NULL.activecanterbury NULL.org/olympic-and-paralympic-hopefuls/keziah-gore/)!

Saturnalia

Posted on by sarah

Saturnalia is the Roman version of Christmas. Visit the Canterbury Roman Museum between 17 December 2011 and 2 January 2012 and discover how sacrifices, presents, games and a big banquet formed the basis of the popular Roman festival. Take part in fun, hankds-on activites, try on colourful costumes and make a pileus or freedman’s hat!

Christmas in Canterbury

Posted on by sarah

Where else to start the season than the Advent Carol Service at Canterbury Cathedral (http://www NULL.canterbury-cathedral NULL.org/), a world heritage centre, the Mother Church of the Anglican Community and seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Following comes the arrival of St Nicholas to Canterbury, culminating in a small parochial service around the life size crib. The image on the left is a stain glass window depicting St Nicholas at St Nicholas Church (http://www NULL.barfreston NULL.org NULL.uk/) Barfreston, near Dover.

Onward then to the Carol Services on the 23rd and 24th December – an increasing exceitment in the air for congregation and choristers alike, until

Christmas Morning when the bells peel for services from 8am through to Evensong at 3.15pm.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Ps   Dont miss the Pantomime at the Marlowe Theatre (http://www NULL.marlowetheatre NULL.com/page/3009/Pantomime)